Monthly Archives: February 2011

2010 IMO (International Math Olympiads) Results

President Obama Congratulates IMO Medalist Evan O’Dorney http://maa.org/news/080910ODorneyObama.html 

High School Math Team from USA wins 3 Gold Medals, 3 Silver Medals at the 2010 IMO held in
Astana, Khazakhstan, July 2-14, 2010
http://amc.maa.org/imo/2010imo.shtml

US Team Brings Home 7 Medals from 2010 China Girls Mathematical Olympiad

http://maa.org/news/2010cgmo.html

Chinese New Year Celebration Art Contest Result

The voting has ended. Thanks to all of you who voted.  Please view the voting result at the bottom of the Voting Box.
 
Diamond’s art got the most votes. Congratulations!  

This Valentine’s Day Will Be a Math Day – Solve Some Tricky Valentine’s Math Problems



1. How Many Hugs?
Figure out a formula (or algorithm) that will calculate the following problem: Your mom gives you on hug on February 1st, 2 hugs on the 2nd, 3 hugs on the 3rd and so on. How many hugs will you have received in all of the month of February? 

2. How Many Kisses?
You want to give your mom one kiss on February 1st, 2 kisses on the 2nd, 4 kisses on the 3rd, 8 kisses on the 4th, and keep doubling for the month of February. How many kisses will you need to give her? 

3. How many Valentine’s are exchanged in a class of 20 if each student gives Valentine’s to everyone in the class?   

4. The florist sells 150 bouquets of flowers. Each bouquet has a dozen roses. Five bouquets were returned because the flowers had ants. How many flowers were sold in all? 

5. February 14th is Valentine’s day. How many ways can you add up two numbers to make 14?  (What about if you use negative numbers or fractions?)

Post your answers before next Saturday, Feb. 19.

The correct answers will be posted on Saturday, Feb. 19. 

The 4th Math Olympiad Test is on Feb. 14th, at 7:15pm – Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Let us all celebrate this special Valentine’s Day with perfect scores on the 4th test of Math Olympiad!

KU Math Competition – Online Registration is Open

The well-known “KU Math Competition”, sponsored by the Math Dept to celebrate the Mathematics Awareness Month of April, will be held on Saturday, April 2, 2011, from 2pm to 3:30pm.  Detail information can be found at: https://www.math.ku.edu/info/info-mathawareness/math-awareness-month-2011/mam11.html 

This year you can register online at www.math.ku.edu/ or https://www.math.ku.edu/cgi/math_competition/register

The inpossible quiz (I made)

Answer all these multiple choice questions. If you get all right you win ( just one question wrong, you lose).

E. 1. 7-6=

A. 2 B. 13 C. 11 D. 76

2. How many letters are in the word hi?

A. 3 B. 4 C. 2 D. 9

3. What do you get when a turtle jumps on you?

A. a turtle B. a bite from a turtle C. nothing D. you get tackled

4. What does blah mean in this sentence?I would like to blah this homework and also blah this stuff as well.

A. do B. destroy C. copy D. take away

E. 5. Do you want to play the smart test?

if so tell me the answers to these questions.

What’s your pet’s name?

How many stripes are on your shirt?

What’s the color of your tennis shoes?

What’s you’re school’s name?

What’s the first question I asked you?

A. What’s the color of your tennis shoes? B. What’s the first question I asked you? C. How many pets do you have? D.What’s your pet’s name?

 

Put answers here by Feb. 28. I’ll be posting the answer key by then.

About The Second Writing Workshop

The second writing workshop is another 4-class session that runs about 8 weeks. Students meet once every 2 weeks. No class during spring break.

The dates are: Feb. 19, Mar. 5, Mar. 26, Apr. 9.  (all on Saturday)
The time is: 10am to 12pm.
 
The location: Room 209, Cedar Ridge Christian Church, 8835 Lackman Rd, Lenexa, KS 66219-1901 
 
The fee: $50. Please pay the teacher directly at the first class.
 
Class limit: 22. 
The students from the first workshop get priority. Other students are first come and first serve.  If there are enough students above 22, Mrs. Schank will offer a separate class.
 

Let’s Join In the MMXI Ricebowl Challenge Feb. 6 – 12

Hi there! Are you watching Super Bowl XLV right now? We can have a bowl challenge too!  Please join in the MMXI Ricebowl Challenge (Feb. 6 – 12), play intellectual games, raise rice and beat global hunger, and have fun at the same time!

You go to www.freerice.com and either:

1) Login as: KS_shinygems2011, Password: kcshinygems2011
Play the vocabulary game. The grains of rice you win will be part of the group total.  No individual totals.  OR

2) Sign Up with your parent’s address, use your blog name as the username on freerice.com, join our group “KC Shiny Gems Club“. The rice you earn will be included in our group total, and will also show as your individual total.   NOTE: it will ask for your birthday date and require your parent permission.

Our group is in the challenge and competing with other groups in the world.  The screen shot below shows that “Diamond” has signed up and joined the group. We hope to see you there too!  Please tell your parents to allow you because this game is a vocabulary game and has the good cause too!

Cheddar Moon – Chapters 1, 2, and 3

     Chapter 1

     I have a story to tell you, young readers. This is a long story, one that occurred when I was a mouse your age. It has been a very long time, so I might not remember everything. But if you listen carefully and quietly, I will tell you about the time when the moon really was made out of cheese.

       In the olden days, it was easy for us to live. There were few humans to disturb us, and they left us in peace. We built our homes out of old wood strips, and shredded fabric was used for bedding. Every home was large enough to hold ten mice, but discreet and small enough to be hidden from passing humans. We spent much of our time indoors, taking care of siblings, gathering fabric to shred for bedding.

       One day, I decided to explore the great outdoors. I had heard from family members that everything was different.

       “It’s dangerous, you know,” my sister said. “You never know what’s out there!”

       Shrugging off her concerns, I prepared to leave, packing a bag full of food, wood strips, and fabric in case I needed to shelter in an emergency or lost my way. For the rest of the day, I was extremely restless, eager to get outside. I tried to pretend everything was the same, trying to keep a nonchalant attitude. My strategy didn’t work.

      “You’re awfully quiet tonight,” my mother remarked as she passed me a bowl of soup. “It’s minced morsel stew, your favorite, and you haven’t said a word!”

       “Yes,” my father added. “Is something wrong? Is there anything troubling you? If so, you can always ask your mother and I for advice.”

       “No, it’s fine. Everything’s okay. I guess I’m just tired,” I say, hoping the conversation will end soon.

       “Charles has been thinking about-!” I cut my sister off with a warning glare.

       “Thinking about what, darling?” my mother intervenes.

       “I-I didn’t really mean that,” my sister says. “I think we should all sleep early tonight. We all seem tired.” Kayla lowers her gaze, picking up her spoon, gesturing to everyone to do the same.

       “Let’s eat!” my mother says, rubbing her hands together. “The stew’s getting cold. Charles, if you’re not going to eat that, dump it back in the cooking pot. Otherwise, stop playing with your food and eat a decent meal.”

       I decide to leave the dinner table, and brush my teeth for bed. However, I don’t sleep. I spend my time planning my escape into the outdoors world. Hours pass. Night falls. I hear Kayla come upstairs, stepping softly, trying not to “wake” me. She tucks my blankets more firmly around me then closes the door and leaves.

       I wait three long, excruciating hours in bed, until the clock chimes. Midnight. I know Mother and Father must be asleep, but I stand up to check. Pressing my ear to the door, I listen. Not a single squeak. I grab my bag, check my inventory, then scribble a note to my parents telling them of my decision to explore the outside world. I stick the note to my bedroom door, and creep down the stairs, silent as a shadow. I am looking back at my home for the last time. I turn around, my hand firmly around the doorknob. I am turning the cold, smooth handle when-

       “Charles!” my father’s voice comes to me. I start, my hand releasing the doorknob. My father comes racing down the stairs, stumbling and tripping on the last four in his haste to reach me. “Wait, son! Don’t go!”

       “Father?” I say, my confusion evident. “How did you know I was leaving tonight?” Suddenly, I realize. “Kayla! She told!”

       “Yes, she did, Charles. And she did so for good measure. Kayla didn’t want you to go alone. We arranged a way to help you during dinner,” he says calmly.

       “But you can’t stop me from going on the adventure of my life, Father! I’ve been dreaming of it! Besides, you and Mother can manage without me just the same. Kayla can cook, and Sarah can sew! You don’t need me here!” I protest, whiskers twitching in frustration.

       A sad expression crosses his face. “Charles, I don’t want you to go alone. You’re my only son. Just let me go with you,” he says.

       “No, Father. I’m sorry, but this is my mission. I promise to return as soon as possible. I just don’t want to leave Mother with Kayla, Sarah, and Baby Nellie to take care of. Please let me go alone. Please!” I beg, awaiting his decision.

       We stand in silence, until Father straightens, opening the door. “Good luck, Charles,” he says, “and I wish you the best on your journey.”

Chapter 2

       Readers, do you remember when my relatives said that everything was different in the outside world? It certainly was. After leaving the house where I had spent my entire childhood, I had stood outside in the dark, dim light of the world when it was sleeping. There was not a sound, just the calm, warm resonance of lake water lapping at the shore, the scent of a summer breeze being carried through the trees, sending blankets of soft, green leaves down onto the carpet of green grass. I stood outside for nearly one hour, breathing the scents of summer beauty, admiring all that I could see at one time. Finally, lying in the shade of a tall, sturdy maple tree, I fell asleep, comforted by the smells and sounds of nature.

       In the morning, I awoke to the sounds of birdcalls. I had never before heard them, because my home had been so isolated from nature. I watched the sun rise from the horizon, watched the darkness of night fade, to be replaced by the vivid, bright golden colors of dawn. I slowly climbed up the maple tree, and sat on the lowest branch to eat my breakfast. I was so immersed in watching the sun rise that I did not notice an angry bird squawking and screeching above me.

       The bird turned to its nest, reached in, then dropped a squirming, wriggling worm square on my head. I shook it off in anger, then threw it with all my might to where the bird was. The worm was too heavy for me, and I dropped it onto the carpet of green grass surrounding the tree. The bird fluffed up its feathers in contempt, then flew away to get more food for its chicks. I heaved a sigh of relief, then gradually slid down the tree trunk. I kicked the worm away, where it wriggled twice then stopped moving.

        Sitting on the bag I had brought with me, I began to plan things out. I found a piece of tree bark which I used for a notebook to plan my journey, and I found some sticks to use as a calendar. I went back to the maple tree to grab more tree bark, and I stuffed the pieces into my bag. I found two old, rusted bottle caps, and I attached them to the bark pieces to make a wagon. I held everything together with some tree sap, and I put my bag onto the wagon. Now was the time to gather materials, I thought to myself. I should make use of the daylight while I have it.

       Pulling my wagon, I searched the base of the tree for any materials I could use to write with. With no luck, I sat down, brainstorming. My eyes wandered to the decaying worm, and I leaped onto my feet. I raced to the top of the tree as fast as I could, and sat on the highest branch. Looking down at the abandoned bird’s nest, I measured the distance with my eyes, and jumped. I landed on the very edge, but my weight caused the nest to tip over, and it sailed gracefully in the air before landing several feet away from my wagon. Panting with the effort, I slumped against the nest, trying to catch my breath. Once I had restored my energy, I hauled the wagon to the nest, and piled the eggshell bits into the wagon. The dried-up eggshells would work perfectly as chalk, and when I used up one piece, I still had some to spare. I counted the shell bits, and recorded it in my tree bark journal. Exhausted from all the muscle-stretching work I had done – building a wagon was no easy task – I ate a simple lunch and fell asleep. A day’s work had been done.

 Chapter 3

     After waking up from a long and luxurious rest, I stretched, twitching my whiskers and waving my tail. My muscles felt very tense and sore, and I was unwilling to get up. I was unaccustomed to the hard, rigidness of the ground I slept on, and I longed for my warm, dry bed at home. My bed at home had been lined with the softest, smoothest fabric my mother could find, and it was always fresh and clean. My makeshift bed of fabric strips was meager in comparison, and it was wet with morning dew. Undaunted, I laid the fabric strips onto the dry bark of my wagon, hoping it would dry throughout the day.

       Shaking the sticky dew drops off my ears, I picked a dandelion stem to eat for breakfast, but the stem was too tall and slick for me to hold. It blocked my vision, and I ran into the maple tree. A piece of bark fell, opening a hole in my new shirt. I realized it was time for a change. I decided to spend one whole week under my maple tree shelter, patching clothing, gathering food, and doing other miscellaneous activities. I wanted to gather food, but my clothing was in need of repair, so I decided to patch my shirt in the bright daylight, and I could use the dim light of the night to gather food. That way, I could make use of my time while staying safe under the cover of night.

     I grabbed a clean, white shirt from my wagon, ducked behind the tree to change, and emerged with the torn shirt in my paws. My day of sewing was about to begin.

     I had never been good at sewing – that was always what Sarah had loved to do. My younger sister would happily patch clothing while I gathered food and materials for the family. I never had time to watch her sew and mend, so it didn’t surprise me that I was clueless right now. However, I was spared the trouble by the surfacing of a distant memory. In the memory, I was watching my mother sew, her furry paws warm and soft from hours of chores. She was mending a pair of overalls, and she was instructing me. “Charles,” she had said, “I know you don’t sew. But even if you do, some time in the future, you need to remember to always watch the needle and the fabric. You can’t let your eyes wander and stray or you could hurt yourself.”

       With the memory fresh in my mind, I set to work. Grabbing some tough weeds and grass, I tore the grass into thin shreds. I had found a human-sized needle, and I worked the shredded grass into the hole of the needle. The job was a lot harder than I thought. The needle was too big, so I had to hold it with two paws. It took me the entire day to patch the paw-sized hole, but it was better than nothing. Only until I had finished did I realize how hungry I had been. I had been concentrating so hard that I forgot to eat lunch! Oh, well. I guess I’d transition straight to dinner!

       For dinner, I ate the leftovers of the dandelion stem I had eaten this morning. The plant was delicious, and it satisfied my hunger and thirst. Sitting on my favorite tree branch, I reflected on my day. I realized that this was the life I had always wanted, one where I could explore and figure things out for myself. I enjoyed my new independence, and I wanted to make it last. Watching the sun set, I could form only one thought in my mind. Nature has given us many gifts in life – my gift is the ability to explore and enjoy life in a completely different perspective.

Cheddar Moon – Chapter 3

       After waking up from a long and luxurious rest, I stretched, twitching my whiskers and waving my tail. My muscles felt very tense and sore, and I was unwilling to get up. I was unaccustomed to the hard, rigidness of the ground I slept on, and I longed for my warm, dry bed at home. My bed at home had been lined with the softest, smoothest fabric my mother could find, and it was always fresh and clean. My makeshift bed of fabric strips was meager in comparison, and it was wet with morning dew. Undaunted, I laid the fabric strips onto the dry bark of my wagon, hoping it would dry throughout the day.

       Shaking the sticky dew drops off my ears, I picked a dandelion stem to eat for breakfast, but the stem was too tall and slick for me to hold. It blocked my vision, and I ran into the maple tree. A piece of bark fell, opening a hole in my new shirt. I realized it was time for a change. I decided to spend one whole week under my maple tree shelter, patching clothing, gathering food, and doing other miscellaneous activities. I wanted to gather food, but my clothing was in need of repair, so I decided to patch my shirt in the bright daylight, and I could use the dim light of the night to gather food. That way, I could make use of my time while staying safe under the cover of night.

I grabbed a clean, white shirt from my wagon, ducked behind the tree to change, and emerged with the torn shirt in my paws. My day of sewing was about to begin.

I had never been good at sewing – that was always what Sarah had loved to do. My younger sister would happily patch clothing while I gathered food and materials for the family. I never had time to watch her sew and mend, so it didn’t surprise me that I was clueless right now. However, I was spared the trouble by the surfacing of a distant memory. In the memory, I was watching my mother sew, her furry paws warm and soft from hours of chores. She was mending a pair of overalls, and she was instructing me. “Charles,” she had said, “I know you don’t sew. But even if you do, some time in the future, you need to remember to always watch the needle and the fabric. You can’t let your eyes wander and stray or you could hurt yourself.”

       With the memory fresh in my mind, I set to work. Grabbing some tough weeds and grass, I tore the grass into thin shreds. I had found a human-sized needle, and I worked the shredded grass into the hole of the needle. The job was a lot harder than I thought. The needle was too big, so I had to hold it with two paws. It took me the entire day to patch the paw-sized hole, but it was better than nothing. Only until I had finished did I realize how hungry I had been. I had been concentrating so hard that I forgot to eat lunch! Oh, well. I guess I’d transition straight to dinner!

       For dinner, I ate the leftovers of the dandelion stem I had eaten this morning. The plant was delicious, and it satisfied my hunger and thirst. Sitting on my favorite tree branch, I reflected on my day. I realized that this was the life I had always wanted, one where I could explore and figure things out for myself. I enjoyed my new independence, and I wanted to make it last. Watching the sun set, I could form only one thought in my mind. Nature has given us many gifts in life – my gift is the ability to explore and enjoy life in a completely different perspective.

Cheddar Moon – Chapters 1 & 2

Author’s Note: I have added this post so that readers could understand the story more easily because I haven’t written this for a LONG time!

Chapter 1:

      I have a story to tell you, young readers. This is a long story, one that occurred when I was a mouse your age. It has been a very long time, so I might not remember everything. But if you listen carefully and quietly, I will tell you about the time when the moon really was made out of cheese.

       In the olden days, it was easy for us to live. There were few humans to disturb us, and they left us in peace. We built our homes out of old wood strips, and shredded fabric was used for bedding. Every home was large enough to hold ten mice, but discreet and small enough to be hidden from passing humans. We spent much of our time indoors, taking care of siblings, gathering fabric to shred for bedding.

       One day, I decided to explore the great outdoors. I had heard from family members that everything was different.

       “It’s dangerous, you know,” my sister said. “You never know what’s out there!”

       Shrugging off her concerns, I prepared to leave, packing a bag full of food, wood strips, and fabric in case I needed to shelter in an emergency or lost my way. For the rest of the day, I was extremely restless, eager to get outside. I tried to pretend everything was the same, trying to keep a nonchalant attitude. My strategy didn’t work.

      “You’re awfully quiet tonight,” my mother remarked as she passed me a bowl of soup. “It’s minced morsel stew, your favorite, and you haven’t said a word!”

       “Yes,” my father added. “Is something wrong? Is there anything troubling you? If so, you can always ask your mother and I for advice.”

       “No, it’s fine. Everything’s okay. I guess I’m just tired,” I say, hoping the conversation will end soon.

       “Charles has been thinking about-!” I cut my sister off with a warning glare.

       “Thinking about what, darling?” my mother intervenes.

       “I-I didn’t really mean that,” my sister says. “I think we should all sleep early tonight. We all seem tired.” Kayla lowers her gaze, picking up her spoon, gesturing to everyone to do the same.

       “Let’s eat!” my mother says, rubbing her hands together. “The stew’s getting cold. Charles, if you’re not going to eat that, dump it back in the cooking pot. Otherwise, stop playing with your food and eat a decent meal.”

       I decide to leave the dinner table, and brush my teeth for bed. However, I don’t sleep. I spend my time planning my escape into the outdoors world. Hours pass. Night falls. I hear Kayla come upstairs, stepping softly, trying not to “wake” me. She tucks my blankets more firmly around me then closes the door and leaves.

       I wait three long, excruciating hours in bed, until the clock chimes. Midnight. I know Mother and Father must be asleep, but I stand up to check. Pressing my ear to the door, I listen. Not a single squeak. I grab my bag, check my inventory, then scribble a note to my parents telling them of my decision to explore the outside world. I stick the note to my bedroom door, and creep down the stairs, silent as a shadow. I am looking back at my home for the last time. I turn around, my hand firmly around the doorknob. I am turning the cold, smooth handle when-

       “Charles!” my father’s voice comes to me. I start, my hand releasing the doorknob. My father comes racing down the stairs, stumbling and tripping on the last four in his haste to reach me. “Wait, son! Don’t go!”

       “Father?” I say, my confusion evident. “How did you know I was leaving tonight?” Suddenly, I realize. “Kayla! She told!”

       “Yes, she did, Charles. And she did so for good measure. Kayla didn’t want you to go alone. We arranged a way to help you during dinner,” he says calmly.

       “But you can’t stop me from going on the adventure of my life, Father! I’ve been dreaming of it! Besides, you and Mother can manage without me just the same. Kayla can cook, and Sarah can sew! You don’t need me here!” I protest, whiskers twitching in frustration.

       A sad expression crosses his face. “Charles, I don’t want you to go alone. You’re my only son. Just let me go with you,” he says.

       “No, Father. I’m sorry, but this is my mission. I promise to return as soon as possible. I just don’t want to leave Mother with Kayla, Sarah, and Baby Nellie to take care of. Please let me go alone. Please!” I beg, awaiting his decision.

       We stand in silence, until Father straightens, opening the door. “Good luck, Charles,” he says, “and I wish you the best on your journey.”

Chapter 2:

       Readers, do you remember when my relatives said that everything was different in the outside world? It certainly was. After leaving the house where I had spent my entire childhood, I had stood outside in the dark, dim light of the world when it was sleeping. There was not a sound, just the calm, warm resonance of lake water lapping at the shore, the scent of a summer breeze being carried through the trees, sending blankets of soft, green leaves down onto the carpet of green grass. I stood outside for nearly one hour, breathing the scents of summer beauty, admiring all that I could see at one time. Finally, lying in the shade of a tall, sturdy maple tree, I fell asleep, comforted by the smells and sounds of nature.

       In the morning, I awoke to the sounds of birdcalls. I had never before heard them, because my home had been so isolated from nature. I watched the sun rise from the horizon, watched the darkness of night fade, to be replaced by the vivid, bright golden colors of dawn. I slowly climbed up the maple tree, and sat on the lowest branch to eat my breakfast. I was so immersed in watching the sun rise that I did not notice an angry bird squawking and screeching above me.

The bird turned to its nest, reached in, then dropped a squirming, wriggling worm square on my head. I shook it off in anger, then threw it with all my might to where the bird was. The worm was too heavy for me, and I dropped it onto the carpet of green grass surrounding the tree. The bird fluffed up its feathers in contempt, then flew away to get more food for its chicks. I heaved a sigh of relief, then gradually slid down the tree trunk. I kicked the worm away, where it wriggled twice then stopped moving.

Sitting on the bag I had brought with me, I began to plan things out. I found a piece of tree bark which I used for a notebook to plan my journey, and I found some sticks to use as a calendar. I went back to the maple tree to grab more tree bark, and I stuffed the pieces into my bag. I found two old, rusted bottle caps, and I attached them to the bark pieces to make a wagon. I held everything together with some tree sap, and I put my bag onto the wagon. Now was the time to gather materials, I thought to myself. I should make use of the daylight while I have it.

       Pulling my wagon, I searched the base of the tree for any materials I could use to write with. With no luck, I sat down, brainstorming. My eyes wandered to the decaying worm, and I leaped onto my feet. I raced to the top of the tree as fast as I could, and sat on the highest branch. Looking down at the abandoned bird’s nest, I measured the distance with my eyes, and jumped. I landed on the very edge, but my weight caused the nest to tip over, and it sailed gracefully in the air before landing several feet away from my wagon. Panting with the effort, I slumped against the nest, trying to catch my breath. Once I had restored my energy, I hauled the wagon to the nest, and piled the eggshell bits into the wagon. The dried-up eggshells would work perfectly as chalk, and when I used up one piece, I still had some to spare. I counted the shell bits, and recorded it in my tree bark journal. Exhausted from all the muscle-stretching work I had done – building a wagon was no easy task – I ate a simple lunch and fell asleep. A day’s work had been done.

Please vote for me if you like my drawing!

I drew this:

If you like this picture, please vote for me(crystal)! I don’t think I did a very good job on the Chinese words but anyway, Happy year of the Rabbit!!!

Vote For Ebony’s Art – Happy Rabbit Year!

I took this picture in the Nelson Atkins Art Museum’s 2011 Chinese New Year’s Celebration event.  Inside the building, right when you walk in, the hall was decorated with lots of lanterns that spread the festive spirit of the holiday.

I am not a very good photographer, but do you like it?

Chinese New Year Pic #2

I hope it is ok to post a second entry. If I can’t I would like to use my first picture for the contest.

Seasons Greetings From My Apple Tree

Hello, hello, how are you here,
Little birds chirp into my ears,
The pile of leaves just blow away,
I came to your window just to say,
IT’S SPRING!!!

My blossoms now are juicy fruits,
Are specially what I produce,
I know the beach is such a hit,
Aroma at the B-B-Q pit,
IT’S SUMMER!!!

My little apples, shake and rustle,
The busy squirrels just run and bustle,
Collecting berries at my feet,
‘Cause in the winter they hide and eat,
IT’S FALL!!!

My branches bare, and blank and stiff,
You now tube, and ski, and ride a lift,
The dusty, dry, and pure white snow,
It’s getting really cold y’know,
IT’S WINTER!!!!

Happy, happy, Rabbit!

Happy Rabbit Year

How many rabbits do you see in the picture? There are two rice cakes(front and back). Rice cake is called “Nian Gao” or “Nian Nian Gao” which rhymes with another phrase “Nian Nian Gao” in Chinese, meaning higher and higher, year after year.  In other words, it means increasing goodness in one’s life. It is a tradition to eat Nian Gao with other delicious dishes on Chinese New Year Eve which symbolizes advancement, wealth and good luck.  Wishes to all shiny gems Nian Nian Gao. If you like the picture, please vote for us. Thanks.

Pigs in a Blanket

Pigs in a Blanket

By Ivy Schank

Have you ever eaten pigs in a blanket? You know, it’s the mini hot dogs wrapped in bread. So don’t confuse them with actual pigs in a blanket. Well, if you have eaten them… they hate you. They think you eat them because they think you think they are actually pigs in a blanket. well, you know that they ARE NOT. But, that is beside the point. One day the pigs took a trip to the beach. they laid out their towels, and laid down with blankets on them. Someone else at the beach mistook them for food. The pigs were asleep and then the people took them, cooked them up and had a lovely pigs in a blanket dinner. (with mustard of course!)

Fireglass – Chapter 2

     The nurse, seeing my pale expression, immediately stands up. “Did I hurt you?” she asks.

       “No, it’s just-!”I stop. Why bother explaining to someone who has no idea about it? “I’ll be fine, Mrs. Powell. I just have one thing to ask, if it’s okay with you,” I say.

       “Ask away, Lizzie,” she says cheerfully. “I’m all ears.”

       “Is it okay if I borrow a wheelchair or a pair of crutches? It’s hard for me to walk because my legs are so sore.”

       Mrs. Powell grimaces. “Lizzie, I don’t usually allow students to borrow wheelchairs for fear that they will use them for the wrong reasons. However, if I loaned you a pair of crutches, you would have to walk on one leg, and I know you don’t want to do that. Just this one time – I’ll let you borrow a wheelchair- but don’t let it happen again!” She walks over to the wheelchair I had been asking about and pushes it to the chair I’m sitting in.

       “I won’t, Mrs. Powell. Thanks again!” I gingerly settle myself in the seat and wheel out of the office, heading down to the locker room before class.

       In the locker room, while everyone’s changing for gym, I wheel in. Jennifer Mayfield, my best friend, and Nicole Williams, one of my other friends, are standing next to the door, chatting. When they see me, it’s as if a chain reaction occurs. Jennifer screams, and Nicole follows suit. Then questions start coming at me from both of them.

       “OMG, Lizzie! What happened to your legs? Are you okay? OMG! Did you fall?” Jennifer and Nicole’s screams have now triggered the attention of the other girls, who are crowded around me. Like I said before – being the leader of the A-Clique and the most popular girl isn’t easy. However, my injury seems to have gotten me some extra attention.

       Everyone crowds around me, asking me questions, telling me they’ll call today. Finally, I’ve had enough. I wheel out of the locker room into the gym, telling everyone I’ll text them all about it tonight. They all shriek with excitement, because none of them knew what happened. Except me. But I don’t feel like telling them, either.

       The rest of the day passes in a blur. After school, I head back to the Biology room to pick up my assignments. I go to my locker, take all the books I need for homework, and then I wheel out to the parking lot. I pull my car keys from my purse, and I travel towards my Mini Cooper convertible. I stop in front of the car only to realize I couldn’t drive in my condition. I unlock the car, put my backpack on the passenger seat, and lock the doors. I decide to text Jennifer to see if she could give me a ride. She willingly accepts, and, ten minutes later, she arrives to take me home.

       I lay on my bed, sighing. Jennifer dropped me off two hours ago, but I still don’t have any homework done. I couldn’t focus. I tried listening to my iPod, but it didn’t do a single thing. I watched TV, but it didn’t work. I texted all of my friends twenty times each, but it just made my fingers sore. When my thirteen year old brother came home from soccer practice at 5: 15, I didn’t even bother going down to meet him. I just let him do whatever.

       “Lizzie? Are you up there? Lizzie?” he called. I listened to him take off his shoes, throw his backpack on the floor, and run up the stairs. To discourage him from coming into my room, I slam my door. The door rattles on its hinges, sending a gust of cold wind into my freezing room.

       “Elizabeth! Don’t slam the door on me. You know I hate it when you do that,” he says calmly.

       “Don’t call me that!” I snap. I had already had a long day, and I didn’t need his aggravating serenity at this moment.

       “Look. Just tell me what’s wrong.” His voice, out of nowhere, appeared in front of my closed door. I started, and jumped about three inches off my bed. “How did you get in here?”

       “Never mind,” he said, grinning. His face suddenly turned solemn. “Look, Lizzie. I know what you’re thinking about. Just forget the past. I know it’s hard to forget, but you can’t live in it forever.”

       My anger at him suddenly vanishes. “Alec, I’m really sorry. I didn’t mean to be such a jerk.”

       “It’s okay, Lizzie. I’ve got to go now. I can’t miss football practice. Coach would be absolutely furious.”

       After a homework-dinner (which is sort of like a TV dinner except that I do homework), I lay in bed, ready for another long day. While I had pushed the thought of the Fireglasses out of my mind, my brain wasn’t ready to give up yet. That night, it sent me a vivid dream of the incident. Every. Single. Detail.

A Game For All Horse Lovers

Are you a horse fan? Do you like riding horses or collecting pictures of them? If the answer is yes, you should try www.howrse.com. Trust me – it’s really fun! It’s a free game, and you can take care of horses, train them, enter them in competitions, and do a lot more! By the way, you have to spell the website h-o-w-r-s-e or it will go to a different website. You should try it!

Cheddar Moon – Chapter 2

       Readers, do you remember when my relatives said that everything was different in the outside world? It certainly was. After leaving the house where I had spent my entire childhood, I had stood outside in the dark, dim light of the world when it was sleeping. There was not a sound, just the calm, warm resonance of lake water lapping at the shore, the scent of a summer breeze being carried through the trees, sending blankets of soft, green leaves down onto the carpet of green grass. I stood outside for nearly one hour, breathing the scents of summer beauty, admiring all that I could see at one time. Finally, lying in the shelter of a tall, sturdy maple tree, I fell asleep, comforted by the smells and sounds of nature.

       In the morning, I awoke to the sounds of birdcalls. I had never before heard them, because my home had been so isolated from nature. I watched the sun rise from the horizon, watched the darkness of night fade, to be replaced by the vivid, bright golden colors of dawn. I slowly climbed up the maple tree, and sat on the lowest branch to eat my breakfast. I was so immersed in watching the sun rise that I did not notice an angry bird squawking and screeching above me.

         The bird turned to its nest, reached in, then dropped a squirming, wriggling worm square on my head. I shook it off in anger, then threw it with all my might to where the bird was. The worm was too heavy for me, and I dropped it onto the carpet of green grass surrounding the tree. The bird fluffed up its feathers in contempt, then flew away to get more food for its chicks. I heaved a sigh of relief, then gradually slid down the tree trunk. I kicked the worm away, where it wriggled twice then stopped moving.

           Sitting on the bag I had brought with me, I began to plan things out. I found a piece of tree bark which I used for a notebook to plan my journey, and I found some sticks to use as a calendar. I went back to the maple tree to grab more tree bark, and I stuffed the pieces into my bag. I found two old, rusted bottle caps, and I attached them to the bark pieces to make a wagon. I held everything together with some tree sap, and I put my bag onto the wagon. Now was the time to gather materials, I thought to myself. I should make use of the daylight while I have it.

       Pulling my wagon, I searched the base of the tree for any materials I could use to write with. With no luck, I sat down, brainstorming. My eyes wandered to the decaying worm, and I leaped onto my feet. I raced to the top of the tree as fast as I could, and sat on the highest branch. Looking down at the abandoned bird’s nest, I measured the distance with my eyes, and jumped. I landed on the very edge, but my weight caused the nest to tip over, and it sailed gracefully in the air before landing several feet away from my wagon. Panting with the effort, I slumped against the nest, trying to catch my breath. Once I had restored my energy, I hauled the wagon to the nest, and piled the eggshell bits into the wagon. The dried-up eggshells would work perfectly as chalk, and when I used up one piece, I still had some to spare. I counted the shell bits, and recorded it in my tree bark journal. Exhausted from all the muscle-stretching work I had done – building a wagon was no easy task – I ate a simple lunch and fell asleep. A day’s work had been done.